Using A Car Buying Agent Or Car Broker To Buy Your Next Car

The world of car retailing is changing, and it means good news for car buyers. The traditional way of buying a car from a dealer’s showroom has been around forever, and it’s a game where the playing field is tilted heavily in the dealer’s favour. The dealer knows all of the numbers involved much better than the buyer, and so knows exactly where margins can be increased and reduced to maximise their profits while still appearing to provide a good deal.

It’s a bit like a casino; the punters at the tables may have a few individual wins here and there, but overall the house always wins. Buying a car from a dealer is similar, in that you might get them to drop the car’s price slightly or throw in some extras, but they get it all back again on the finance package or the other extras you hadn’t realised you even needed (but were convinced by the salesman that they were absolutely essential).

The internet has gone some way to helping buyers, in that you can easily check prices from several different dealerships all over the country. But that’s still only a starting point; a dealer will often be happy to cut the price on a car if they can make it up elsewhere, and it becomes very difficult to stay on top of the negotiations when you have a new car, your part-exchange (trade-in), finance, insurance, options and accessories all making up the final numbers. The dealer is expert at juggling all these balls at once, and they know exactly how much they are making from each part of the overall deal. The customer, usually, is completely in the dark as to how much of a deal they are really getting.

More and more car buyers are now turning to a car buying agent or car broker to help them manage their car purchasing. Here the buyer gets to play on a level field with the dealer, as the car buying agent or car broker usually has the same knowledge and expertise as the dealer to be able to negotiate on every aspect of the deal to the advantage of the buyer.

The other advantage of using a car broker or car buying agent is that it saves you an enormous amount of time. Researching cars and trekking all over town to visit dealerships, getting quotes from different dealers on different models and comparing all the information is a tremendously laborious exercise. A car buying agent or car broker can take car of all the running around and allow you to concentrate on your job or enjoy your recreational time.

So what exactly does a car buying agent or a car broker do?

Let’s explain the difference between a car buying agent and a car broker.

With a car broker, you provide as much detail as you can about the car you are looking for, and the broker sources a vehicle which matches your desired specification as closely as possible.

A car buying agent offers a more comprehensive overall service, usually involving specific advice and recommendations on choosing a car and its specification to suit your needs, as well as the sourcing of the chosen vehicle. If you are not sure on the best sort of car for your needs, a car buying agent’s advice can be far more valuable than the savings he or she may be able to get from the dealer. Choosing a more suitable car can be worth a considerable saving over your whole ownership period, even if the deal on the car’s price is not as significant. Many people have bought a car completely unsuitable for their needs, and using a car broker won’t prevent that. A good car buying agent, however, will help you ensure that you are choosing a car which will do everything you need for as long as you own it.

Fees

Brokers and agents make their money from either a fee charged to the client for their service, and/or a payment or commission from the dealer. This is an important point for you as a buyer; if your broker is being paid by a dealer, they are ultimately working for the dealer rather than for you, meaning they may not be acting in your best interests to secure the best car available at the best price possible.

To ensure that your agent is acting in your best interests and not the dealer’s, you should always look for a car buying agent or car broker who has a clear fee structure and does not take payments or commissions from the selling dealer. The fees should be clearly explained, easily understandable, and relate to the service provided. If a broker advertises their services as being free, then it almost certainly means they are being paid a commission or ‘finder’s fee’ by the dealership. If an agent or broker offers their advice as free, it is unlikely to be a properly detailed and analytical report which covers every aspect of your driving needs.

A car broker will normally charge a fee based on the value of the car they are sourcing. If this is the case, you should be clearly aware of their fee structure before you commence – for example, if the relevant price threshold on their fee structure is £30,000, then a car costing £30,001 may mean a much larger fee for the broker than a car costing £29,999.

Some agents or brokers will charge a flat fee for their services, and some may charge a fee based on the level of discount they achieve from the advertised price. This means that the more money you save, the more they will make and gives you some reassurance that they are acting in your best interests.

With a car buying agent, there will normally be a fee for their advice and expertise, and a separate fee for sourcing a vehicle. Again, you should be aware of how their pricing works, but don’t be put off by the idea of paying for expert advice as it may save you thousands in the long term. You may even use a car buying agent for advice on choosing a car but handle the purchase yourself. This is often the case with company car drivers, who have leasing arrangements in place at their workplace but don’t know which car to lease.

In summary, a car broker or car buying agent can make the process of buying a car much more appealing and advantageous to the average consumer, saving considerable time and potentially a lot of money.

Buying a Used Car Part Wisely!

Each time you want to buy a used car part, insist on a great deal. Don’t think you will count on luck though – no way. There are a few things you need to do for making sure you don’t end up with a bitter deal.

Spend a little time now to save you serious money in the future. Make sure to check on Consumer Reports on the safest car parts out there. Appearance is one thing, but safety takes the priority.

Use a credible car yard shop and find out if you can bring the car for on-site fitting. Ask what cars they normally repair most frequently. Get details about the scope of inspection and, how long it takes, including the price. Have this information written as a precaution.

After car part inspection, get a written report with all costs involved for repairs. Also the vehicle’s make, model and VIN must be mentioned in the report. Read through every single small print and where in doubt seek for clarification. Your final offer should be based on the estimates if you ever decide to bargain for the car.

Why you should not buy used part from an individual?

Individuals or private sellers are not covered by the Used Car Rule. They also do not have to use the Buyers Guide. But, you can rely on the Guide’s list of an auto’s major systems to do your shopping. Do not be enticed by the outside look of the used car part, instead depend on the inspection by an approved mechanic.

A private sale is likely to be on an as is basis, the only exception is when your purchase agreement with the seller states otherwise. If a written contract exists, the seller has to live up to their full responsibility. Consider the manufacturer’s warranty or any other purchase contracts. The issue is whether these warranty and service contracts are transferable or not. Prior to the car part purchase, enquire if it’s still under warranty or service contract.

Buying Used Auto Parts

Buying used auto parts is usually an inexpensive alternative to buying new auto parts from your local car parts retailer or an on-line store. It may take some time and creativity to find the exact part, so be patient as there are many different ways to accomplish this goal. But, they fall into three basic approaches: junk yards, classified ads and on-line stores. Let’s look at each one.

Junk Yards

There is usually one part of the city where most of the salvage yards are located. These yards often sell used auto parts for low prices if you are able to remove the needed part yourself from one of their wrecked cars or trucks. And, you will need your own tools. Each junk yard is different so be flexible and be prepared to negotiate as you may be able to purchase whole assemblies as well as a series of parts. Call in advance about pricing and car/part availability. Lastly, you should verify the terms and conditions of the sale and any return policy. Not everything goes as planned.

Classified Ads

Traditionally, used auto parts could be found in the classified ads section of your local newspaper or grocery store pamphlet/publication. Today, you can add eBay, Craigslist and a few more such websites to this category. Depending on the part, the buyer will need to verify that the current condition will not affect its ability to operate properly as most of these sellers (with the exception of eBay) are anonymous to the buyer. Which means, no track record of their relationship with past buyers. If you are using eBay, be sure to check out the seller’s feedback ratings before buying any used auto part. The feedback ratings of buyers can provide you with insight into a seller’s reputation, reliability and selling history. And return policy.

On-line Stores

This newest method can be a very fast and convenient way to locate and purchase a specific auto part. Prices, descriptions, pictures and expanded details are usually available via a searchable database. Be sure to be creative when entering your search keywords so the search engine will give you the results you are seeking. The more exact the keyword match, the better will be the results.

In today’s marketplace, there are lots of options for used auto parts buyers. Old school and new. With a little effort, the exact part for your car will be available.